Predicting potential heave and heave with time in swelling foundation soils
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Predicting potential heave and heave with time in swelling foundation soils by Lawrence D. Johnson

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Published by U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station in Vicksburg, Miss .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Permeability.,
  • Soil dynamics.,
  • Swelling soils.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Lawrence D. Johnson ; prepared for the Office, Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army.
SeriesTechnical report -- S-78-7., Technical report (U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station) -- S-78-7.
ContributionsGeotechnical Laboratory (U.S.)., United States. Army. Corps of Engineers.
The Physical Object
Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15251317M

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Predicting potential heave and heave with time in swelling foundation soils. Vicksburg, Miss.: U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, [] (OCoLC) The model SUCH is capable of predicting soil moisture changes in terms of soil suction and the resulting volume changes (shrink/heave) in expansive soils under a covered area (e.g.. flexible slab. This review highlights the need for simple methods for predicting heave/shrink behaviour of expansive soils associated with environmental changes over time to use them in practice. prediction with heave measurement is ab50% 02%, respectively. 1 Introduction The expansive soil has a potential to increase and decrease in volume under increasing and decreasing water content and as well as suction. The swelling pressure will be imposed on.

The various methods for calculating heave can be grouped into three main categories. These include oedometer methods, soil suction methods, and empirical methods. This chapter discusses some of the more rigorous methods. To predict the amount of heave at a given time, such as the design life, the progression of heave must be considered. caused by change in soil moisture in nonfrozen soils. Foundation materials that exhibit volume change from change in soil moisture are referred to as expan-sive or swelling clay soils. Characteristic expansive or swelling materials are highly plastic clays and clay shales that often contain colloidal clay minerals such as the montmorillonites. Predicting potential heave and heave with time in swelling foundation soils. US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, CE, Vicksburg, Miss. Technical report S Johnson L.P. & Snethen D.R., Prediction of potential heave of swelling soil. Geotechnical Testing Journal, 1, 3, –   Johnson ting potential heave and heave with time in swelling foundation soils Technical Report, U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Geotechnical Laboratory, Vicksburg, Mississippi (), p.

  The term "active zone" generally refers to the zone of soil that either is contributing to or has the potential to produce heave. In order to predict heave at any particular time, it is necessary to define the zone of soil that has experienced an increase in water content and what the swell potential . An Empirical Method for Predicting Foundation Heave Rate in Expansive Soil. Predicted values for free-field heave and foundation movement are basic parameters for the design of foundation systems for buildings sited on expansive soil. Current design procedures generally incorporate only the maximum predicted heave that will occur at a site. The swelling pressure of expansive soils is typically measured at saturated condition from oedometer tests. The experimental procedures of oedometer tests are cumbersome as well as time-consuming for use in conventional geotechnical engineering practice and are not capable for estimating heave under different stages of unsaturated conditions. Fig.(4): Summary for the most famous methods to classify swelling soils [4] could be classified into two types, methods Fig.(5): Summary for the most famous advanced empirical formulas to estimating swelling potential (SP) [2] r methods to predict heave Predicting amount of heave is one of main goals of studying swelling soils.