The Black Sea flood question
Read Online
Share

The Black Sea flood question changes in coastline, climate and human settlement

  • 728 Want to read
  • ·
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Springer in Dordrecht .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Geology -- Black Sea,
  • Geology -- Black Sea Region,
  • Black Sea -- History

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Valentina Yanko-Hombach ... [et al.].
ContributionsYanko-Hombach, Valentina.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE350.22.B55 B63 2007
The Physical Object
Paginationxxviii, 971 p. :
Number of Pages971
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17993733M
ISBN 101402047746
ISBN 109781402047749
LC Control Number2007275713

Download The Black Sea flood question

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

About this book. Stimulated by "Noah's Flood Hypothesis" proposed by W. Ryan and W. Pitman in which a catastrophic inundation of the Pontic basin was linked to the biblical story, leading experts in Black Sea research (including oceanography, marine geology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, archaeology, and linguistic spread) provide overviews of their data and interpretations obtained . Stimulated by "Noah’s Flood Hypothesis" proposed by W. Ryan and W. Pitman in which a catastrophic inundation of the Pontic basin was linked to the biblical story, leading experts in Black Sea research (including oceanography, marine geology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, archaeology, and linguistic spread) provide overviews of their data and interpretations obtained through empirical.   This leaves the question of whether a truly huge flood ever happened. This question has engendered heated debates among scientists. Within the last few years, the theory has been proposed that the Genesis story refers to a flooding that occurred when the then-small lake in the center of what is now the Black Sea rapidly became a large sea. Stimulated by "Noah’s Flood Hypothesis" proposed by W. Ryan and W. Pitman in which a catastrophic inundation of the Pontic basin was linked to the biblical story, leading experts in Black Sea research (including oceanography, marine geology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, archaeology, and.

The Black Sea Flood Question: Changes in Coastline, Climate, and Human Settlement Fordham University, Bronx, NY, U.S.A. A C.I.P. Catalogue record for this book is available from the Library of Congress. Published by Springer, P.O. AA Dordrecht, The Netherlands. ISBN (HB) ISBN (e.   Black Sea Flood. In , two Marine Biologists from Columbia State University, Dr. William B. F. Ryan and Dr. Walter C. Pitman, claim that in B.C., saltwater from the Mediterranean and Aegean seas escaped into the Black Sea, which was a landlocked freshwater lake at the believe the flood covered more t square miles of coastal plains and increased the size of the Black. In a recent article from the Washington Post, explorer Robert Ballard (discoverer of the Titanic) led a team to the Black Sea in search of evidence for Noah’s feet below the surface, they found evidence of a ‘sudden, catastrophic flood around 7, years ago—the possible source of the Old Testament story of Noah.’. The Black Sea is a body of water and marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean between Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Western Asia. It is supplied by a number of major rivers, including the Danube, Dnieper, Southern Bug, Dniester, Don, and the watersheds of many countries drain into the Black Sea beyond the six that immediately border it. The Black Sea has an area of , km 2.

In B.C., the risen waters of the Mediterranean Sea burst through the narrow neck of the Bosporus, inundating and destroying the civilization ringing the fertile Black Sea basin. [The Black Sea was theretofore a smaller Black Lake of fresh water.—Ed.] It is this catastrophe which triggered the great Indo-European migrations.   Interest in the Black Sea quickened last year with the publication of "Noah's Flood," by Columbia University geologists William Ryan and Walter Pitman, suggesting that the modern-day sea .   The Black Sea would have widened at the rate of a mile a day, submerging the original shoreline under hundreds of feet of salty water. Nearly , square miles were inundated. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Black Sea Flood Question: Changes in Coastline, Climate and Human Settlement at Read .